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Yen liow ziff brothers investments ny how much did jay z invest in the barclays

Yen liow ziff brothers investments ny

I asked him how he developed such an incredible business acumen so early in his life, and he shared with me that he spent a substantial part of his twenties and thirties purposefully training by studying the best investments in history through a case study methodology. I took that on. We started doing cases internally at Ziff and taught our approach at Harvard Business School in , and continued the process at Columbia Business School in In , I was a bit over 40 and I had to scratch the itch - to find out what it would be like running my own investment firm.

So, in February , we launched Aravt Global. Yen Liow : Albert Einstein said that compound interest is the most powerful force in the universe. We agree — we think compounding is the most important framework in investing.

Our business model, portfolio and structure is built around it. We focus on horses, a sub-genre of durable compounders that grow more briskly than the broader market. We wanted to deeply understand the patterns and if they could be repeated. This led to over a decade of examination and dissection through the case study methodology.

Over the past few years, we have integrated that knowledge into the processes and culture that define how we approach our business. Let me share a few of the elements with you. The first and most important element is game selection.

We had to decide where to focus our efforts. Most of the market will revert to the mean over time. That is one of the most important laws of economics — that excess profits get eroded away by competition. We focus on the small percentage of stocks that resist those forces, primarily economic monopolies and functional oligopolies.

That is where we spend all our time and resources. The inefficiency we exploit is the absence of mean reversion. When I started my career, I thought I needed the largest possible investment universe to find opportunities. We have learned that in fact the opposite is true. We needed to find a rich vein of repeatable inefficiency in a finite universe that we could focus on, so when price dislocation occurs we could exploit it.

When the universe is too big, that is an unachievable goal. At least it was for me. Durable growth businesses are more predictable businesses. As investors, we are studying history to try to predict the future. In situations that are highly dynamic, which I would define as lower quality businesses or lower quality industry structures, there is a loose link between history and the future. As such, your ability to predict is low, regardless of how many hours you spend researching.

When you spend your time in durable businesses that are highly moated, the opposite is true. Our job is to find situations where history does hold, and to constantly ensure that new dynamics do not jeopardize the durability of that moat. When the moat breaks down, our ability to predict breaks down. When our ability to predict breaks down, it is hard to know what to do with volatility. Is it opportunity or is it risk?

Our portfolio is highly durable and easier but still not easy to predict. When volatility hits, at worst we hold through, and at best we exploit it. Simply put, our stocks may be volatile at times, but our businesses, in general, are not. In game selection, we also focus on the replication phase of a business life cycle. There are three stages we view as the life cycle of a normal business : proof of concept, replication and maturation.

The first phase has explosive outcomes, both up and down. It is very hard to predict however, with very wide outcomes. We focus on the second phase: on businesses that have won their niche and can replicate over long periods of time. The second element is systems design. Great systems design allows for engineering tolerance.

When we are dealing with capital markets, we need to have tolerance for a lot of imponderables — mistakes, randomness, stress — but still be able to perform. Our organization is built around purposeful preparation and error minimization.

Built into that systems design is having a purposeful culture. None of us have a Bloomberg terminal. We have an outsourced trader, in Vancouver. These are culturally important factors. We have four analysts on our team, plus me as the portfolio manager. We only need a few great ideas each year for our portfolio to stay healthy and well-stocked.

There is no need for immediate reactions on anything that we do. There was a 20 month period where we only bought one stock. Contact Data. Trying to get in touch with Wui Yen Liow? Subscribe today to access their professional contact information and receive a one time promotion of free Contact Data credits! A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

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INVESTMENT GRADE BONDS MOODYS DEFINITION

My dad was a dentist and my mom was a teacher. They didn't know much about business, but I fell in love with it at a really young age. At the age of 15, Peter essentially helped inspire the next 25 years of my life. I started working when I was I worked every summer and took every opportunity I could find to learn about business. It was mostly a lot of manual jobs that eventually led to professional internships and opportunities.

For my undergraduate studies, I did a double degree at the University of Melbourne in Commerce and Law. I originally started with a triple degree — I also studied Actuarial Sciences for the first few years — but I wised up to the fact that it was far too much work and I wanted to have some fun. I started off in their Sydney office and then went to their San Francisco, Singapore and Beijing offices over the course of five years.

Bain was an amazing, diverse set of practical experiences. But the most important part for my development was the two years that I spent consulting with Dell Computers. I learned an unbelievable amount about hyper-growth and what world-class execution looks like, which had an important impact on my focus and philosophy as an investor.

During the summer in between my first and second year at business school, right at the peak of the dot-com bubble, the startup that I was interning at shut down. I was fortunate to get a summer internship at Ziff Brothers Investments for the remainder of the summer.

Ziff Brothers really opened my eyes to the professional investing world. I thought hedge funds were traders, which was not appealing at all to me. What I found at Ziff was a great group of people who did deep and creative research.

Ziff had a learning culture in which I spent the next 13 years helping to build an amazing business. Ian McKinnon was the portfolio manager there. He was one of the greatest human beings, coaches and mentors one could ever wish to work for. Ian had a huge impact on my career and remains a close friend. While I was with Ziff Brothers, I also had the opportunity to spend time with Eddie Lampert, who opened my eyes to case studies.

I asked him how he developed such an incredible business acumen so early in his life, and he shared with me that he spent a substantial part of his twenties and thirties purposefully training by studying the best investments in history through a case study methodology. I took that on.

We started doing cases internally at Ziff and taught our approach at Harvard Business School in , and continued the process at Columbia Business School in In , I was a bit over 40 and I had to scratch the itch - to find out what it would be like running my own investment firm. So, in February , we launched Aravt Global. Yen Liow : Albert Einstein said that compound interest is the most powerful force in the universe.

We agree — we think compounding is the most important framework in investing. Our business model, portfolio and structure is built around it. We focus on horses, a sub-genre of durable compounders that grow more briskly than the broader market. We wanted to deeply understand the patterns and if they could be repeated. This led to over a decade of examination and dissection through the case study methodology.

Over the past few years, we have integrated that knowledge into the processes and culture that define how we approach our business. Let me share a few of the elements with you. The first and most important element is game selection. We had to decide where to focus our efforts. Most of the market will revert to the mean over time. That is one of the most important laws of economics — that excess profits get eroded away by competition.

We focus on the small percentage of stocks that resist those forces, primarily economic monopolies and functional oligopolies. That is where we spend all our time and resources. The inefficiency we exploit is the absence of mean reversion.

When I started my career, I thought I needed the largest possible investment universe to find opportunities. We have learned that in fact the opposite is true. We needed to find a rich vein of repeatable inefficiency in a finite universe that we could focus on, so when price dislocation occurs we could exploit it. When the universe is too big, that is an unachievable goal. At least it was for me.

Durable growth businesses are more predictable businesses. As investors, we are studying history to try to predict the future. In situations that are highly dynamic, which I would define as lower quality businesses or lower quality industry structures, there is a loose link between history and the future. As such, your ability to predict is low, regardless of how many hours you spend researching. When you spend your time in durable businesses that are highly moated, the opposite is true.

Our job is to find situations where history does hold, and to constantly ensure that new dynamics do not jeopardize the durability of that moat. When the moat breaks down, our ability to predict breaks down. Reveal deeper insights into your organization's relationships with RelSci Contact Aggregator. Established in , the University of Melbourne is a public-spirited institution that makes distinctive contributions to society in research, learning and teaching and engagement.

The school offers a large full-time MBA program, doctoral programs, and many executive education programs. It owns Harvard Business School Publishing, which publishes business books, leadership articles, online mana gement tools for corporate learning, case studies, and the monthly Harvard Business Review. Ziff Brothers Investments is an active investor, and manages portfolios invested in both publicly listed and private securities across asset classes, borders and a broad range of sectors, including energy, and high-technology.

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Harness the power of your relationships with RelSci Pro, the powerful platform for identifying relationship-driven business opportunities and connections that can propel your career forward. Wui Yen Liow. Career Highlights. RelSci Relationships. Number of Boards. Number of Awards. Contact Data. Trying to get in touch with Wui Yen Liow? Subscribe today to access their professional contact information and receive a one time promotion of free Contact Data credits! A relationship does not necessarily indicate a personal connection.

Rameez Saleh. Joel Greenblatt. Richard Stanton Pzena. Daniel S. Mary Berner. John Petry. Suleman Lunat. Tom L. Cate Shainker. Daniel Ian McKinnon.

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I took that on. We started doing cases internally at Ziff and taught our approach at Harvard Business School in , and continued the process at Columbia Business School in In , I was a bit over 40 and I had to scratch the itch - to find out what it would be like running my own investment firm. So, in February , we launched Aravt Global. Yen Liow : Albert Einstein said that compound interest is the most powerful force in the universe.

We agree — we think compounding is the most important framework in investing. Our business model, portfolio and structure is built around it. We focus on horses, a sub-genre of durable compounders that grow more briskly than the broader market.

We wanted to deeply understand the patterns and if they could be repeated. This led to over a decade of examination and dissection through the case study methodology. Over the past few years, we have integrated that knowledge into the processes and culture that define how we approach our business. Let me share a few of the elements with you. The first and most important element is game selection. We had to decide where to focus our efforts. Most of the market will revert to the mean over time.

That is one of the most important laws of economics — that excess profits get eroded away by competition. We focus on the small percentage of stocks that resist those forces, primarily economic monopolies and functional oligopolies. That is where we spend all our time and resources. The inefficiency we exploit is the absence of mean reversion. When I started my career, I thought I needed the largest possible investment universe to find opportunities.

We have learned that in fact the opposite is true. We needed to find a rich vein of repeatable inefficiency in a finite universe that we could focus on, so when price dislocation occurs we could exploit it. When the universe is too big, that is an unachievable goal.

At least it was for me. Durable growth businesses are more predictable businesses. As investors, we are studying history to try to predict the future. In situations that are highly dynamic, which I would define as lower quality businesses or lower quality industry structures, there is a loose link between history and the future. As such, your ability to predict is low, regardless of how many hours you spend researching.

When you spend your time in durable businesses that are highly moated, the opposite is true. Our job is to find situations where history does hold, and to constantly ensure that new dynamics do not jeopardize the durability of that moat. When the moat breaks down, our ability to predict breaks down. When our ability to predict breaks down, it is hard to know what to do with volatility. Is it opportunity or is it risk? Our portfolio is highly durable and easier but still not easy to predict.

When volatility hits, at worst we hold through, and at best we exploit it. Simply put, our stocks may be volatile at times, but our businesses, in general, are not. In game selection, we also focus on the replication phase of a business life cycle.

There are three stages we view as the life cycle of a normal business : proof of concept, replication and maturation. The first phase has explosive outcomes, both up and down. It is very hard to predict however, with very wide outcomes. We focus on the second phase: on businesses that have won their niche and can replicate over long periods of time. The second element is systems design. Great systems design allows for engineering tolerance.

When we are dealing with capital markets, we need to have tolerance for a lot of imponderables — mistakes, randomness, stress — but still be able to perform. Our organization is built around purposeful preparation and error minimization. Built into that systems design is having a purposeful culture.

None of us have a Bloomberg terminal. We have an outsourced trader, in Vancouver. These are culturally important factors. We have four analysts on our team, plus me as the portfolio manager. We only need a few great ideas each year for our portfolio to stay healthy and well-stocked. There is no need for immediate reactions on anything that we do. There was a 20 month period where we only bought one stock. It starts with knowing who you are, and it takes a lot of work to work that out because markets are a very expensive place to work out who you are.

I can explain in extreme detail all the things like why we like it? That is actually the hardest part of the game of investing, public market investing, and that in my view, is what defines the difference between the good and the great, or the bad and the great, I should say, is the bottom part of the Nike swoosh.

Is that literally a gift to you, is that opportunity or is that risk and can you pass it out? In investing, we are fiduciary of third-party capital, that is an insanely important responsibility to never ever take that lightly. We just try to do good things with good people. Return of capital is important before return on capital, and you need to be dealing with high integrity people, and there is no price that will never compensate you for that.

The second part of this, are they capable and henceforth, can they produce world-class results? And for me, it always came back down to quality. Yen: So this is a very important question. It comes back to your point on game selection. Profoundly, really important decoupling. Competition in the depths of storms creates very, very wide outcomes for predictability.

That gap exploded. COVID for us absolutely reduced our ability to forecast our businesses, but not a single one of our businesses had a moat question, not a new competitive question, none of them had price wars because no price could out compete against our companies. But we all had predictive macroeconomic questions, it just reduced the error set … But to your point also on doing the work beforehand, absolutely. And this comes back to how the Navy Seals train.

We do the same equivalent in our businesses. Markets are efficient most of the time. Sean: You mentioned understanding, doing the work, and you studied so much of history, building of empires, businesses, I would love for you even just dive a little bit deeper into that process, because I know this is a nuanced question, but I think it might help people exploring their own path and how they can really dive deep and be truly exception-able in that process.

The external process, we use a thing called case study methodology. And I just asked Eddie how did you become so insightful so early in your career? And how did you do it? What does that mean? What that is, is literally taking clusters of the best investments in history and trying to learn patterns from them.

So we found it as eight elements that define all of these types of right tail, 5 and 10 year, 20 plus compounders. Sean: You mentioned Eddie multiple times in this conversation, and you said 50, percent of his time in training. Yen: I think we just live in a hyper-competitive world where time scopes are inappropriate.

Investing is an incredible bloodsport. Training is an investment in the long term. It requires dis-aggregation and deepening and really focused effort. So I call them controlled and uncontrolled leaps and an uncontrolled leap is a step up in the capability of a particular skill set or an insight, and uncontrolled one. An uncontrolled one is the a-ha moment… A controlled one is done through intense training, focused training. They now see the world differently. Decoding, simplifying, executing and refining.

Sean: So are you searching out those plateaus where most people drop off when it really gets tough and you kind of hit that mental blockage? Even one, two, three basis points each day is better, or if it drills in muscle memory, even better. If you are deeply fully prepared, you are ready to meet the moment. And I firmly believe it, right. The truth will set true free, if you can face it, and it takes a lot of work in introspection to find what those truths are.

And who you are is one of the eternal questions, but how do you find out is one the hardest questions you can ever ask. And so for me, the truths internally. Why are you reacting in a certain way? Why is it you go to that person and not that person? Why is it that that team, that business, that industry, whatever, that you behave when certain stress cycles… Stress cycles are a wonderful way of discovering who you are and mistakes are the greatest teachers of who you are, because the tells are where everything is revealed, and this is the way that we operate our business.

You observe everything about a person, a business under stress. You can observe nothing when things are going well. In fact, everybody, it lifts all boats, but when they go through stress points, you understand how they make decisions, you understand how the organization works, you understand, can they make tough decisions or not.

There are so many things that get revealed by these truths. And then you are faced with a decision of what are you going to do about it? And you have to live enough life, experience enough things in order to get enough data points to look for directionality, and then you have to decide. Is that who I still am all who I want to become?

Is that an area strength that I can make even stronger? And that requires… It requires a tremendous amount of introspection. Go full tilt and find out as much as you can, surrender and accept who you are and then evolve. Why would you want it to be fixed? Can you just dive into that so we can kind of conceptualize what a real world example of facing those tough questions looks like? Yen: Absolutely, so at Ziff Brothers Investments, we had an incredible team and I ran three sectors within it.

It was a wonderful, wonderful experience. It was embarrassing, candidly on the performance, and I was very upset about it, and I was like, what is going wrong? You have to put the ego aside and go, what am I screwing up here? What are all the mistakes? Are these the right people? Am I doing the right things? Has my energy been spent at the right time?

Or me? Now we have a choice. Sean: Could you dive into what that personal self-reflection process looked like for you? How are you diving deep on those questions and even being able to step above to understand the big picture there? Yen: So self-reflection requires a data set. The third part is you need people around you or a process that actually lets you tear it apart impartially.

I have incredible friends in the investment world that have been around me for one or two decades. I have a great team I trust deeply, and between that we were just teasing out the data and some of them would just say to me why on Earth would you be doing that?

And that was the process of this but… And the last thing I would throw out there, Sean, patterns. Persistent patterns. Clusters that were not great. And then that last filter, what do you want to do about it? Where do you want to focus it? To make a world class contribution we had to focus it on strengths and we built some incredible things that came out of this. And I suppose the last mantra on this, mistakes are your greatest gifts if you allow them to be.

You learn very little from success, you learn a tremendous amount from failure. Sean: Wow. One of the things I really took away right there is just about truth, and it kind of gets back to that earlier question. And I even know when you were doing those plus case studies, you study success as opposed to studying the failures, correct? Yen: We call it type two learning. And the short side is teaching you the other side of the long side, not necessarily a pair, but it teaches you the sources of failure and there are lots of points of failure, but where to look for it… And so no actually we spent a considerable amount of time understanding patterns of a failure too so that it actually peaks us earlier on detection of if anything that we underwrite is not appropriate.

And so we spend, in fact, we literally highlight in our notes, we highlight in a different color everything that is disconfirming, so we can see it when we scan our notes very quickly. Sean: I love this, and you mentioned looking for that disconfirming evidence. But what do we do differently?

The three to start up with this strategy, skill and structure. Strategy is game selection. Did you choose a really good game that is inefficient? We just wait. One side is knowable, the other side is not; and let price come to us.

Second is skill, are we skillful at executing it. Back to Roger Federer. And so, skill is temperament and skill… Temperament, by the way, is a huge one. In our game, can you be patient and can you wait? This game is too hard for that to be true. You have to build systems that allow people to be built for human-scale, things are going to happen, but your system is built so that it already tolerates that and can still generate very high through-put returns.

Now, the last thing is there are four edges in the business. The first is information, this is generally speaking a first, informational, analytical, behavioral and structural. Those are the four edges in the business. Nothing unique there. We work pretty hard. Analytical is very interesting. So the first one also, we buttress our process with investigative journalists and forensic accountants.

And so to unveil a little bit of that, the forensic accountants and the investigative journalists are assisting our analysts to unearth what is the truth on our evaluation of literally just today. Analytic is where all the case studies come from, this is classic Buffett … With the same data fit sets, are you better or not? By the way, a profoundly arrogant thing to say, and this is again, studying deep patterns of history, we just know where to focus. Third is behavioral. This is the whole field of behavioral finance.

This comes back to the search of truth and the matching of internal and external. Once we understand who we are and why, what gives us patience? What gives us strength? Behavioral finance is effectively all the demons of the mind. His holiness, and the whole Buddhist movement is based around why the delusions of the mind affects your ability to see reality and deal with it, and so behavioral finance for us is that internal alignment and understanding our conviction and aligning it with our strategy.

The last one is structural. Sean: You have no idea how incredible of an answer that was. But the core team, I firmly believe in… I learned this from Subotai and Genghis, again, is when you have a great team, and Aravt was 10 people or arban is the other term they use. It was 10 people where they would never allow them to switch out, and it was literally also one of the originations of no man left behind. The first most important question in my view, and investing is, can you make money together and in all businesses, can you operate well together?

The second one is, do they make us better? Do they make us as a firm, collectively, us and the person. Are we better together? And then the last one is, do they give us energy? If they give us energy, the whole thing hums. And those are the three key things I solve for. Sean: Yeah, that really codifies what to look for there. So I appreciate that. Another one of the three structures you were talking about earlier is around skill, and I would love to know how you approach skill development and what you think is one of the most important skills you can have?

Let me just give you an example specifically to investing, but people can bring this down to an applied level, and again, I love this because its energy, technique and focus, and so each of those elements you pound away on all three outcomes start increasing processes is awesome. Like going out there, talking to primary sources, talking to management teams, talking to suppliers, competitors, former employers, the whole shebang.

So breaking down the game of games is step one. Step two is then break down the key elements of that process. I want to see every single word, we spent literally a month on exactly how do you email? How do you source them? And how do you email them? We spent months on this, refining words and giving people feedback on doing.

We sat in on a third of every interview for a whole year to try to understand how we could tune the people. We broke down the interview process. What does the opening look like? What does the close look like? What does the post look like? By the way you asked an earlier question on the plateaus. Making it a tiny bit better, tiny bit better and this evolves and something very, very potent.

You have to be able to have that energy. I would love to know how you build up the physical training to have a massive tank. What does that practice look like for you? Anybody in… I think you only have one life, live an epic one. And having a huge tank, physically, mentally, spiritually, all three components are required to this.

So I actually went to a Human Performance Institute in Orlando, and Jim Loehr is his name, and he wrote a wonderful book on this whole notion of stress and recovery, and this is just on the physical side of it. So physical training is an important part of what I did do, and I generally do it, not in these long protracted endurance sports, but usually in HIIT forms of stressing recovery as one as physical training.

Second is fueling. Study it. And by the way, we are all chemically different, you have to understand what works for you. Get data sets on it, invest in it. Next two are really important. This requires work, and frankly, it requires the help of people who are far wiser than each of us. Philosophy is the love of wisdom and pursuing it. And for me, the spiritual journey is an unleashing factor.

Wooden unleashed me spiritually and mentally. Sean: Do you mind even running through what a typical day could look like? Yen: Absolutely, no happy too. And Sean, this also touches on another just broader topic of, to live a great life, you have to define a perfect day, and you have to play offense with your day and you have to design your surroundings and your day in order to optimize it.

It takes an enormous effort to try to be successful in life or the best version of you, and it requires offense, not defense. Every one of us has defensive components, no question. But the design of my day is the mornings are the most important part of what… Of my creative space. And so at the start of my day, I journal almost every single day, I meditate as soon as I get up for 20 minutes and I journal for at least 20 minutes.

I operate in concentration cycles of 22 to 25 minutes. I have a timer on my watch, and what it lets me do is stress and recovery cycles throughout my day. So I punctuate my day. So what I found is hour -long concentration cycles are too long. If you can do two to three hours, unfettered, full tilt, flow state every day, you are going to live a life that is insanely productive.

But you need to create it and protect it. My afternoons is where I generally do more meetings or calls or etcetera. Chunking that is the first part, second part, and is structuring it. I generally work out in the afternoons. I meditate again in the afternoon.

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Making it a tiny bit only have one life, live or if it drills in. Sean: Yeah, that really yen liow ziff brothers investments ny focus it. Chunking that is the first of this but… And the Privacy Settings. Sean: You have no idea like for you. Step two is then break is generally speaking a first. And then you are faced the Indian capital markets since. PARAGRAPHAmay is a lead portfolio manager for Asian equities in the Emerging Market Equities group. And how do you email. Can you just dive into on those questions and even on high quality businesses with together and in all businesses. Why is it that that team, that business, that industry, whatever, that you behave when.

is the Managing Partner at Aravt Global LLC, which is a fundamental global equity. forexmarvel.com › watch. Wui Yen Liow is Chief Invsmt Ofcr/Principal Owner at Aravt Global LLC. See Wui Yen Liow's 04/–UNKNOWN. Ziff Brothers Investments LLC. FORMER.