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A selection of new key reports, books, journal articles and websites. All items are available on interlibrary loan through the JV Barry Library. Please contact your own library for assistance. Every local government in Australia is invited to participate in an online survey about their use of CCTV. This research is important because it will help to better inform the use of CCTV and other crime prevention initiatives in local communities.

Please contact Shann Hulme by phone 02 or by email shann. Switch Editions? Latest Popular Top Rated Trending. Channel: JV Barry library. All items are available on interlibrary loan Mark channel Not-Safe-For-Work? Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel. Previous Article Next Article. Giancola, Ralph E. Marlow Safer communities : a journal of practice, opinion, policy and research 13 2 Summary: Reviews the reasons why there has been a fall in the volume of recorded crime in the UK and other liberal economies What works and what does not work in reducing juvenile graffiti offending?

Cirilization will be given in mmature throughout the day A ph. CoUege radio and television' crews will bg working through- out tbe area and all buildings will be open to the public. Bom in Ber- instruction in art from Michael houine. In , she moved to and is now living in Tor- ist went to Paris in to Tunis and later lived in the Sa- onto. The pictures will be hanging in the corridors of Hennepin HaU and in tfae' foyer of the re- sonrce centre at the college.

Viewing hours for the exhibi- tion are 8. Mon- day through Thursday, 8. Btoore; "En,ali. The nucleus of the collection, which now consists of 79 paint- ings, representing the works of 69 artists, was formed in during the th anniversary of Canadian Industries Ltd.

Catharines Standard! March 20 , 19 College will throw open its doors to the genera! Organized by students in the journalism 9nd public administi-ation courses, this year's open house will give parents, pros- pective employers and future college stu- dents the chance to see what Niagara has to oUer.

Eivery building on the college's Woodlawn Rd. Each course at the college will have a display aimed at showing what it teaches and how. Visitors will also get the chance to talk with instructors. The open house — dubbed Reflections; this year — serves a purpose other than let- ting the public see what goes on at Niag- ara. Tlic inild weather of Uie past few days lias mosl people thillking of spring and it wiis evident loni tlie turnout at the School of Horticulluve of Niagara College on Niagara St.

An open house drew "on the plus side of S. Oflft people. Getting some hints from first-year horticultuial technology student Robin White nu the care and feeding of spring daftodilj. Bryce Goodwin. Austin Jelbert. Featured were lab demon- strations, folk singers, films, art and slide presentations of the vaiious subjects and facil- ities available at the Woodlawn Rd.

One event marred tihe open house. Someone turned in a false alarm at about 4 p. They returned a few min- utes i? The students sold tickets on prizes, which were drawn by the school's president, Anthony Manera. The only shadow that was cast on the proceedings came when a fire alarm was triggered lale in the afternoon, causing evacuation of the Sim- coe building. All returned to normal however, when it was discovered to be a false alarm. This year's open house with an estimated attendance of H,-, outdrew the one held last, year by approximately 1, From Monday to Thursday the display will be open from a.

Douglas Finch, St. Catharines, left, assistant chair-i man of the business division; and Eobert Baddeley, St. Vi: ' bts to Niagara College got chance to find out when they visited Ihe law enforcement display course display set up yesterday at the school's ODcn house. Here Richard Warden gels his prints taken by law 1 enforcement student Heather Hawthorne as his mother, Mrs. David Warden, watches with interest.

The Evening Tribune March 29, Sidewalk Survey Finds Mixed Views On Budget Tlie provincial budget, tabled last" night in tlie legislature call- ed for increases in the cost of liquor, cigarettes, gasoline and tuition for college and univer- lily students. In regard to the increased tui- tion. I have been looking for a job since Christmas and still have nothing definite " College student Brian Burgon questioned the logic of increa- sing tuition costs if it deterred people from continuing their education.

He said the increases were the logical place to hit a person, adding they "have to pay for their luxuries". Mr, Moser did say the increase in tuition costs should have been omitted but pointed out the bud- get contained a "very excellent'" program for lower income groups and the elderly.

Antoine Raymond, an em- ployee of Atlas Steels, said the budget will "give the people with low incomes a better chance. Anthony S. Cathar- ines, in the background, ex- amine the set on display at the Niagara College open house. The chess set, made by ma- chine shop instructor Arth'ir i Gill, are all exact to. That was the reaction today of Dr. Alan Earp. BrOclt's aci- ijig president, to the provincial govermneiit's announcement ' that the basic tuition costs will be hiked.

Earp, acting president in the absence of President James Gibson, said he was di. He said the increase will de- ter some students from apply- ing to university. The number of students applying to univer- sity will also depend on wheth- er there will be enough jobs available to this summer, he added. At Brock's teachers college where the enrotoient is only 10 students, flie effect of the in- crease could have a more dev- astatmg impact. Up to now, a student did not have to pay tuition at teachers' college.

The Brock teachers college has about applications to date, equal the present enrol- ment. At Niagara College where the enrolment is constantly increas- ing each year, the college pres- ident feels that' if the jump in tuition does reduce appli- cations. Niagara CoUege would still, have a healthy enrolment in Niagara College has a present full tune day-mrolment of about 1, sftudents. I hoped it would have been smaller," Mr.

Manera said. Tuition fees at schools of nursmg will also be uistituted for tlie first time. The prorincial govern- ment also has increased the land transfer tax which will fraotSonaliy increase the cosl of buying a house. Stephen Fedor. However, he said the risino labor and material costs are more significant than Ihp ;a.. The new schedule will be n. The present rates, which remain in effect until Friday midnight, are 0.

He is Bill LeFeuvre. LeFeuvre formerly of St. Cathannes takes over from Jack Gravel. The votuig turnout was 28 per cent at the 1,studeiit college of applied arts ahd technology. The new president said a pe- tition is bing circulated at the school protesting. Niagara College students will join students from other col- leges at a Queen's Park dem- onstration Friday to voice dis- approval of the tuition hike.

Busfs will leave the college al 7 a. The demon- stration aegsmeA the presi- dent of the student adminis- trative council at Centennial College. Toronto, gets under way al 9 a. Elected vice-president was Al Schaftiier. Catharines, head m inlemal affairs — John Stone. Timmins, fi- nance — Greg Edwards, St. Niagara Falls. Manera told the Welland. Kinsman club last night. Some of these ways include taking an extension course or courses to update skills or ac- quire new ones; hiring com- munity college graduates; using the college's facilities or services, to the extent that its resources allow; and, in the case of people who are experts in the licltis the college offers programs, volunteering to serve on an advisor.

A community college educa- tion, Mr. Manera said, is char- acterized by some six factors which include: a large variety of courses and programs; prac- tical orientation; and open door admissions policy and, rele- vance of programs, MANY COURSES He said the colleges offer lit- erally hundreds of courses rang- ing from, at Niagara, personnel administration, to air condition- ing and refrigeration technican, to theatre arts to social ser- vices. Ma- nera noted. Probably the community colleges have ad- dressed themselves more deci- dedly to this issue of relevance than any other institution I know.

As time goes on, I hope the human element will contin- ue to play a dominant role in our programs and that the type of education we provide -will make a definite contribuUoa towards the improvement of the human condition". Manera ended his ad- dress with a tribute to commun- ity college graduates. Over the two - day session, courses in steward training, col- lective bargaining, union admin- istration, compensation, safety and health, the Unemployment Insurance Act and fhe New Democratic Party and labor's political responsibilities were presented to delegates from area locals.

George Marshall, regislrar for the session, said the CLC sponsors schools such as this across the country every Spring. The one at Niagara, he aid, was a small one with delegates ittending. Explaining the purpose behind the weekend schools. CLC educa- 'tion representative for the On- ' tario region, Robert Gower, said the classes aid local union offi- cers and those who aspire to be officers.

The course, part of the Niag- ara's school of continuing edu- cation spring and summer pro- gram, will run from August 7 :to 26 on the Nlagara-on-the-Lake ' campus. Workshops will be held on jazz and big band arranging ; jazz and pop choral interpretation ; basic sound recording techni- ques in the high school; and the practices, legalities and busi- ness of music.

For the school or community music director, workshops will be held on adaptive arranging and score alteration and music theatre production techniques. Those wishing to attend the session must have their appli- cations in to the college by June A special brochure for fur- ther information can be obtain- ed by phoning or writing the Wetland campus. I find tihat the older one comes home and teaches everything to the younger one. The program, for children who will be attending kinder- garten in the school year began this past October and winds up later this month.

It was approved by the board as a pilot project and was set up in three schools on a three morning per week basis at each; St. Andrew, Welland; St. Ther- esa. Port Colborne and St. Ann Niagara Falls. It was explained by Sister Johanna, the board's early child- hood education consultant and school principals Sister Vicfor- ine St. Andrew ; Sister Oliva St. Theresa and Brian Kelly St. A miiiiite'board-made video- tape production showed what the course was all about, through act ual c las sroom learni ng ex- periences and glimpses of field trips.

BASIC AIMS The two basic aims of the pro- gram were to develop language and social skills of the children Organizers were concerned with making the child feel com- fortable in coming to school, familiar with the school envir- onment and familiar with thera- elves. The basic assumption was that if a child was made to feel free, to feel comfortable in the school setting, some of the dif- ficulties that cause learning teaming problems later on will be eliminated," he said.

Sister Johanna, in explaining the philosophy underlying the program, said "education out- side the home must begm eai-ly and must aim to help the in- dividual to fulfill his potential because learning is a process that begins at birth.

Children had a considerable amount of adult direction but at the same time were made to feel secure without adult control. It is relevant to in- tellectual and socaal develop- ment. Play is mental activity, physical activity and creative activity. He has to have a good, secure, happy feeling j about himself. In Jan. I The video - tape showed; children at work in the class- ' room painting, drawing at ; play in the gym on rope swings, ' climbing bars at play on the' playground slides, rolling cyl-j inders and on a field trip through Central fireball.

Learning situations became alive through the use of house- hold pets, the telephone, the sandbox. Classroom size was limited to about 20 students at each of the schools. It was also pointed out that many of the children came from families where English was not the prime language spoken in the home.

Two of them were that it be allowed to continue in the three original schools next year and that it be expanded to three additional schools and be cal- led a junior kindergarten. Hopefully, it just might come about. Kelly pointed out that sev- eral have requested information concerning it. Playwriglit Moliere in fact lias everything come out too right, in a takeoff on convention- al play endings. Long before then the audience has become accustomed to events reaching the pomt of ab- surdity, as satirical comments and repartee are mixed with sheer buffoonery and slapsticli The stories conceived by the title character.

Scapin, to tell the men he wants to bilk, re- quire considerable suspension of rationality. The story has two young men about Paris in the 's madly in love with two young maids. The girls are apparently without family connections, and the boys' fathers, both rich, are de- sirous of having suitable daugh- ters - in - law. Back then boys as well as girl.

To gel a nest - egg, each of the young men employ Scapin, a mere servant but gifted with an inventive mind and a glib tongue. He gets the money for each, makes a fool of one of the old men by tricking him into taking a beating and the other by scaring him. The girls turn out to have family, in fact they are the long lost daughters of I ho two old mi- sers, appropriately jorted out for the two sons.

Not a loose end is left when the play con- cludes, A large representation muM. Even the arthritic old men move hither, tilither and yon about the expanse and Scapin bounces around with fantastic energy under director Frank Norris' and assistant director Catiiy Camp's instructions. Costumes designed by the sec- ond - year theatre arts students were colorful and appropriate to the period.

Mike McAIonen lied the whole thing together as Scapin. He played the part with relish and was quite believable in verbal and facial expression and reac- tion. His chief adversary was Cer- onte played by Lloyd Dilworth. His reactions to the situations Scapin puts him in were eloquent and he matched the emotions in his lines. Pat Roberto did Ws us- usal excellent job in the part of Argante, the other old man. Leandre played by Peter Ku- fluk and Octave played by Greg Rogers seemed quite properly the incompetent but earnest young men who provide the grist for Scapin's mill.

Bonnie Campbell was a little uneven at first in the role of Zebinette. Argant's daughter,! The show runs eveiy eveninai through Friday. Not so much that you can come and enjoy yourself. Not so much that you can play sports and wear tlie college sweater. But basic- ally that all the colleges exist for is to ensure that you grad- uate in a few years, h'ence with something called an education.

As far as many people are concerned, a college is a college for education. But I think these people are forget- ting some veiy basic and im- portant facts, facts that a col- lege is where you do earn an education. And I say earn be- cause it is a place for expci. It's a place to go out and learn thefive basic qualities without which you will never succeed m fite. For Luciow, it was the second straight year he's been named top athlete at Ni- These five quaUties I think you learn more not in the class- room, not in your social activ- ities but basically on the basket- ball court, the football field and I be hockey rink, "The first is sacrifice.

You lave to practice. Without prac- 1 tice you won't succeed, "What else did you learn this year? You learned something called determination. If yo5 quit, you never, never succeed. When the goifig gets rough, thats when you have to get going.

And determination is what life is all about. He's so proud because of the crest he has on his sweater. John Ferguson was a terrible skater, he couldn't pass the puck and he couldn't check. But he always managed to do something.

And he had something, he had tremendous pride in the craft that he was and the sweater he wore. He' would have never had let the Montreal Canadiens lose last night Sunday after they had it. He wouldn't have let them down. That is needed in a winner. The same with hockey. No man is an island. You'll find that out in life. You have to get along with other people. You have to work together "Team-work, whether you be a policeman, a college professor or a student. In the police de- partment, team-work is the es- sance of survival.

That's what you learn in sports more than an,vthing else. You have to obey the rules and reg- agara. He also spoke very highly of Als' coach Sam Etcheverry. Manera, president of Niagara College spoke before Sprmgate. He welcomed every- one to the banquet. Luciow, Niagara Basketball Knishts' leader all - round, was bestowed the honor last night at he third annual Athletic and Awards banquet sponsored by the Athletic Department and the Stu- dent Administrative Council.

Bob Kraliz was namrd the male freshman while Diane Audet was the female re- cipient. For the girls varsity volley- ball team, Diane Martens was selected the MVP while on the nasketball team. Lois Hajen was bestowed with the honor. Keith Taylor was named! When it came to the basket- ball Knights. Luciow was hon- ored again with the MVP award. However, the hockey Knights had five members take home letters. The other letter went to Betty Olsen of the curUng team. Three students were also hon- bred v.

Inter - mural winners for hockey, floor hockey and basket- ba'l received awards and badges for their past performances while Niagara's tennis, golf, badminton, ' curling, volleyball, basketball and hockey varsity teams in OCAA competition also received badges. The two- some had, a very fine combined average of 2. Niagara's number one fan, Paul Forestell received a spe- cial award while the Knight's I hockey club presented a plaque i to coach Fred Bassi.

But indivi- ually. Communications Gets Top V Niagara Student Priority I Improving communications will be one of the primary ainris of the new Niagara College stu- dent administrative council, and toward that end, a new position has been created on the council executive. The idea, he said, was to im- prove communications not only internally, but externally as well.

With the college growing in size, communications has become a full - time job and one person is needed to devote his Ume to it. Although communications may be lacking, Mr. LeFeuvre point- ed out the college has come a long way in solving problems in areas where some schools are still encountering difficulties. The students at Niagara have a better relationship with the administration, better facilities and are more active in the social areas than many colleges, he caid.

To keep up the good relations and communication between the administration and students, the council executive has a meeting every second week with college president Anthony Man- era where problems and sugges- tions from both sides can be aired. Stone plans to have an information board in each build- ing for the posting of student information and will make ex- tensive use of the college radio and television facilities, the Ni- agara News the college news- paper and area papers, Future general meetings of the student body are also planned to aid in keeping all informed with activities programs, and prob- lems as they arise.

LeFeuvre said the summer job situation was a "real thorn", but added he didn't know if the student government could do anything about it. Stone pointed out a group of girls from the college early childhood education program have applied for a grant under the Opportunities for Youth pro- gram, to run a day care centre at the college over the summer.

Director of Student Affairs Al Aboud added the college always hires a few students to work around the school in the sum-! Stone suggested the area of providing accommodation for if students shougd be investigated. Aboud noted, all col-jj leges have been surprised by; the number of students drawn j from out of town and the factj; the schools have not developed,: as planned, along the lines of American commutor colleges.

No college below Sudbury can use funds for building on-cam- pus residences, and although thej ; SAC investigated an offer of aij renovated building, the yearly! Coming into power April 1, they have not yet had time to set up anything said Mr. Le- Febvre. Niagara-on-lhe-Lake, on Sunday, April Hob- ort Welch will officially open the p. It wiU be oijen lo liie pubuc at. This exhibition is designed lo introduce and promote the members and their work to tlic people of the Niagara area.

Among the items presented will be e. April 11, 19 Some colleges don't even have a lounge. LeFeuvre was addi-essing members of the press at a luncheon called to introduce members of the new council. He said students are con- sulted bv everi- level of admin- ish-ation on decisions which concern them, and this makes for few demonstrations and protests. John Stone, head of internal affairs for the council, agreed IJiere are few activists, but con- fessed that the student body is apathetic.

He suggested more bulletin boards, and better working relattan- ships ivith the school's tele- vision static. Stone said council is con- sidermg a program of visiting chssrodms and holding more Seiiernl meetinas of council which would be open to all stu- Idarts. Abode, the college s direc- tor of student services, said the college wocid again employ a number of students to' do grounds work about the Well- fflid campus.

Last year about 12 students were hired, he said'. The school term finishes April 21 and final examinations: will run from April 23 to Designed by Gerenscer and 'Russell of Welland, the link-up structure will house the college book store, counselling centre, placement office, staff lounge to serve and student coffee shop.

Tlie building will have 16, square feet of floor space and will be mostly one - storey. The link - up structure had to ; be built before the college could continue further building, said Director of Resources Allan Wyatt. The structure will serve as part of a central core linking up the newly - completed buldings to future development, and has an expected completion date of January.

One move already undrr way. Since September, there have been 60 returning students there and Mr. Wyatt said by next Sep- tember, there will be The transfer of these students will lead to the closing of the adult learning centre on East Main St. Wyatt said would probably occur "this fall.

The Manpower students will all be taking their classes in Hennepin Hall, the first build- ing constructed on the Welland campus. Starting in February drainage! Also under consideration in the! The Evening Tribune - April 12, ! Beth Bridge- man, recording secretary; Bill LeF'euvre. The professional unit is expensive with its heavy duty broadcast quality equipment.

The economy line units are invari- ably standard vans which are functional but have inherent deficiencies. They are subject to rust and corrosion and may eventually succumb to electrolysis with the attendant cost of replacement parts and down-time maintenance. For on-location use there is a lack of high- way stability and high winds virtually preclude the technician's ability to roof- mount cameras.

The interiors are com- pact but have little or no turn-around space. Now there is a new unit on the market and in operation at the Niagara College of Applied Arts and Tech- nology. Paul Davoud, programme co-ordina- tor, radio and television department at the college said. It was at this point tenders for mobile units were put out and Denlen Elec- tronics Corporation entered the picture. Dennis Sullivan, president, and Maur- ice Evans, chief engineer, had been exploring and developing ideas for a compact unit which could be a standard for small broadcasters — cable com- panies, community colleges and for educational television.

The body is guaranteed for five years. It was aerodynamically designed for highway stability and has facilities for roof-mounting cameras. The unit is 24' overall with 6'7" headroom and 7'6" wide which affords technicians and supervisors freedom of movement without stooping and ample room for storage of cameras, cables and tripods.

At right is the equipment rack. The Link cameras supplied with the unit are monochrome, have a built-in Rank Taylor-Hobson zoom lens with servo iris. Remote CCU camera control units controls are provided to the engineer's position giving control of line and field scan reversal, negative and positive picture, remote servo and lift. At the ecu, aperture correction, gamma correction and cable equaliza- tion can be selected although the camera can be used with up to metres of cable without equalization.

The type camera can be modi- fied at a later date to color using an E. I, striped vidicon, which will be within the price range of most cable operations and colleges. The cameras have full talk back facilities, i.

However, the fact remains that the viewer is used to professional quality pictures on the home receiver. It will be open to the public from 3 to 9 p. Among the items on display will be posters, book jackets, textiles and costume design and weaving. The idea behind the spring term is to provide adults, both young and old, with an opportun- ity to relax ,have a little fun, take on a new activity, or get ready for summ er living. Last year, the first in which a spring evening program was offered, there was an exce'lent response from the public.

Arnot Mclntee, Dean of Continuing Education, expects this year's program to be even more popu- lar. With titles such as BarB-Q'ing for the Outdoor Chef, Special Photographic Projects for Summer, and Vegetable Garden- ing for the Homeowner, the ex- periences and courses planned invite us to a summer of inter- esting and enjoyable living.

One of the most unique courses is the "Antiquitours series, t'. This will be a series of 3 day lours, by bus. Registraotion in person For all spring courses Is on Tuesday and Wednesday. April 18 and 19; and interested individuals may tele- phone or 3S a di- rect line from WelSanrli, exten- sion 3R, for further details.

Don MacDonald, chairman of. Niagara CoUege's board of gov- lernors yesterday. He ipaid tribute to the "vital role! The provincial statute : which created the community. The members are ; drawn from the citizenry at large, with the main qualifica- [tion being an interest in the I course. In order to achieve hat goal, the staff needs a feedback from the community on the effective- ness of the teaching: Are people being trained for the right jobs, and if so, how thoroughly are.

The advisory committees are an excellent "medium of com- imunication" between the college and the public Dr. MacDonald I felt, wliich works both ways. Effective functioning of the col- lege depends greatly on this two- way communication, stressed the spokesman. The lecture room has two rear projection screens and "a front projection screen racked over the blackboard, a movie screen rolled up in the ceiling.

The tour was followed by a ' dinner, prepared and hosted by'l hotel management students at the i Refect or y i-n Niag ara Falls. In keeping with its policy of holdmg Its meetings in as many cormnumtles in the Niagara Pen- insula as possible, the ne. Dunnville and Forf Erie. I Colborne. The policy recognizes tJie j fact the college serves an : area encompassing a , number of municipalities, according to!

Welland itself is honie to many forms of live stage activity, in addition o the sole movie liRa- Ire. The presenlahons range from. During the fall winter and spi'ing. The cnniTfIs IfiuI low. Music is also. Both work in Ihe field of ballet predominant ly. The stage at Centennial audi- torium is home to the Welland Little Theatre Players four times a year. They mount their productions in their own quar- ters on Church St.. The annual drive fo sell season m'emberships for all foiu- plays is now on.

The aim of the course is main- ly technical, but the best way to test iheir skills is wilh a an actual show. Many 'of the students were offered jobs M. It is hoped this may also. The, last studio show w;is written by Ruth Swayze of Fori Erie. Plans are not yet definite, but I seems likely the students at!

Charlie Brown" arranged by the Rotary Club. This summer a group of young performers lead by Dcsmon'! Davies Lif Brock University will r-ovrv the ai-ea. Tn applied ai'ts. I Business-minded students can choose from several business ma- nagement program marketing courses, secretarial, all aspects ;0f computer work, btatistioal.

The display runs until Sunday and is open to the pu 9 p. The oim of the shqvV' h and their work to area retail'? What inter- est there is lies only in the stor-i ies. This particular show put on by the School of Continuuing Education used some of the staff and one Theatre Arts student but four persons were iiew tO'the stage.

The difference' in experi- enced and unexperienced per- sonnel was very marked with only Ogwen Glyn - Jones, Ivor and Evelyn Humphrey's really coming to life. A set design by Gree Rogers ; with various levels and tomb- stones behind each of the eight ' readers did rather suggest a j rural hillside cemetery.

Ught- ' ing by Peter Kufluk was too dif- fuse, further missing an oppor- tunity to add some dramatic ex- citement to the production. The singers were Denize j lonita and Christine Macif i with Victor Silvio plaving the Iguitar, singing and doing some i readings. A series of eight quite diverse plays is being lined up again for nest season's presentations at the Niagara College Theatre Centre on Empire St.

The the- atre will reopen in September. There will also be informal stu- dio productions and the chil- dren's Saturday workshops will be continued then also. The post-war craze on educa- tion is a practical reality in Nia- gara South, especially in Welland where well over 1, persons are involved in adult education. Two excellent programs pro- vided by Niagara South board of education and Niagara College attract businessmen, housevives, technicians, factory workers, farmers and secretaries and pro- vide a kaleidoscope of courses.

The city's four secondary schools currently attract per- Sewing is a big hit with the ladies, according to Mr. J Krar. The wcpk project involves 40 lo 5t teachers who provide courses Monday through Thurs- day. Centennial nrovidcs the most complete prngrair: of the four schools in the cty including com- mercial courses, cake decorating, flower arranging. English, French.

Ukranian, j GerTnan, and Spanish. Welland High and Vocational School offers sewing, art and guitar; E"astdale. Lnstrumental strings music lis available at Fitch St, Senior iSchooI and attracts mosdy ele- imentary school pupils. Labor Studies Program Here II Canadian First It's education with a differ- ence at Niagara College where labor and management sit down together — not to discuss their differences — but to study and learn; where industrial supervi- sors take time off during the working day to concentrate in- stead on books and seminars.

These are just a sampling of the college'.? Whitahouse, assistant dean of the school, said, "Uni- queness runs right through this school. Thii is just what his proyianis nltempts to do. In an a-iie of ecn- nomic crises and industrial un- rest, labor education can help both Unionists and management "replace unreasoned emotion oy a professional approach to col- lective bargaining," Enrolment has increased and programs have broadened every year.

In the first year of the labor studies program, only the history of the trade unions in Canada was taught. Courses now include human relations in the union, communication, contem- porary social problems, econo- mics and psycRology. Courses in Ihi. Fourteen - full - iinii-. White- hnnse said, "An average of A special sort of instructor is needed lo kindle this interest and involvement, Mr.

White- house said. The educator of working adults must have life and work experience as well as academic background. He must he able to bring meaning and relevance to the classroom; he muit have empathy with the adult student. A two - year program leading to a diploma in industrial rela- tions in geared to a broad range of career opportunities and is "designed to provide knowledge and understanding of industrial relations processes, and of hu- man behavior, as well as skills in problem-solving.

Objectives of the certifi-cate progam in labor. Krar recalls several suc- cess stories from his involvement with the adult education program over the past eight years. He said that two years ago two ' persons took a complete grade 13 course in night school. He also mentioned a retired couple in their 70s who took a course in conversational Span- ish at the school a few years ago to prepare for a trip to Mex- ico.

They returned to the class- room the following year to take jthe advanced course in Spanish land spent two months in an iso- lated Mexican village, completely fluent. One high school dropout took the adult education program to j "prove to me and my parents" : that she could get her secondary school diploma. She did. The story of self- achievement is repeated yearly.

One unique aspect of the adidt education program in Welland, as in other areas of the province is that of community involve- ment. This year, two courses in Ukrainian and two in yoga arc being caught because of commuiii'v requests. Enrolmrni is divided fairly evenly b. Tbe adult education lirogram in secondary sdiools had drop. OOfl persons. Well over courses are avail- able in the fields of business, applied arts and technology and special interest.

The bulk of the courses are of- fered from Monday through Thursday with the occasional course on a Saturday morning. According to Arnot Mclntee. In the first term, which ran from , September to December, 1, ' were enrolled. The "feature attraction" this , year seems to be the course in ' western civilization with an en- : rolment of 90 persons.

A study of tlie history of the Niagara Peninsula also attracts a good crowd, says Mr. A course in "fire science" or firefighting was launched this year at the Welland campus with an excellent turnout. Other popular courses include speed reading, retail sales, ac- counting, industrial hydrauhcs and heat treatment.

In addition to classroom In- struction, the college's extension branch is also involved in appren- ticeships, working closely with local industries. In the fall term, courses j were offered at the Welland cam- , pus and a total of across the peninsula in other centres such as St. Fort Erie and Dunnville. The second term consists of a total if courses with 85 being offered in Wei]land. While much of the leisure time The Evening Tribune - April 29, will be taken up with some sort of recreation,, many of the mem- bers oi Welland's adult world will turn to such centres as Nia- gara College and the city's ele- mentary and secondary schools ;to engage in some sort of learn- ing process.

When the Addiction Research Foundation undertook drug us- age surveys in the former Lin- coln and Welland County area and Haldimand County, the com- puter was called in to process and compile all the findings. More recently, students at the college have been at work com- piling the Ontario Hockey Asso- ciation Junior A statistics and converting them over to be com- piled on the college computer. The main, general purpose computer, a Honeywell Calder noted since the machine was installed, it has been upgraded twice and a third upgrading is under consideration.

This is one O'f the major factors against purchasing such a ma- chine outright. With its 24, locations of memory, each of which can hold one character, the Niagara com- puter is unique in that it is a straight tape system- Most sys- tems, said Mr. The main differeiic-o in Ihe two types, he said, i. Cal- der stressed that any leasing of computer time would be on a "very, very casual basis," and the work would have to be of academic value to ihe students.

Over the year, he said. Of the remaining 50 per cent of the time, "a good chunk" is taken up processing the regis- tration, student grades and fin- ancial affairs for the college. A League, utilizing the college computer.

For much of the season, stu- dents compiled the statistics manually but 'ate February the system was in the pncess of being totally computeriied. Leaving Sept. Davoud will start woi'k in October, pro- ducing a series of documentar- ies for the Commission and pos- sibly doing some outside work with the Australian Fedcation of Commercial Television.

Starting out with the CBC. Davoud's career has already taken him far and wide across Canada. This led to more documentar- jies and eventually a job as stu- dio director for the Toronto based program, "Sunday Morning". Davoud decid- ed to travel to Vancouver- He got as far as the Lake- head, where he stopped to 'visit relatives and while there, he dis- covered community colleges. Deciding to see what the new- 1 ly established college system was like, Mr. Davoud stopped at the local school, saw what it was like, met the administration, and four hours later was sign- ing a contract to help the col- lege start up a felevision depart- ment.

That was i three ':years ago. One who obviously enjoys hisj work. Davoud cited Niagara I for the "outstanding" courses j and facilities offered, naming in; particular, radio and television, : journalism and theatre arts. Personally, it will be the f ul- 1 fullment of a longtime wish to! The attitude at the college. When new facilities are com- pleted, the retraining program's i counselling staff will amalga- mate with the college's coun- i selling department and Henne- I pia Hall will be renovated this j summer to accommodate the retraining students.

I The East Main St. Early in June, ; Fred W. Frohwein and Dr. Saltarelli and Mr. Ny- gren visited the counselling cen- tres at St. Catharines and Kit- chener under the Ontario Man- power Retraining Program spon- sored by their local boards of education. A full - scale meeting was held between representatives of all appropriate departments and agencies in the city to obtain their views and assess the inter- est in, and need f-or, a counsel- ling centre.

The Welland board of educa- tion was directed to move the project forward and during the term, the board's advisory vocational committee appointed an Ontario Manpower Retrain- ing committee under the chair- manship of Rueben McArthur, This committee found the site and recommended they proceed quickly with a centre for adult counselling. During the commit- tee's hunt for a site, it was de- cided to expand the purpose to include classroom facilities along with counselling- The Main St.

SERVICE PROVIDED Counselling at the centre was mainly oriented towards educa- tion counselling and vocational guidance, but there was some overlapping to include family, ibudgeting and ipastoraj counsel- ling as the need was required- The courses offered at the centre are commercial steno- grapher, machine shop, welding operator, upgradinig to the grade 10 level and English as a second language for new Cana- dians.

The centre developed under the guidance of the Welland board of education, but it was, turned over to Niagara College of I Applied Arts and Technology July 1, The additional renova-' tion at the college will make!

Patrons can expect whisky bottles, cereal boxes, Grand Funk and auto parts. The show, which opened Sunday, is the work of about ad graphic arts and fashion design students from Niagara College. It focuses on commercial art, and there is some steikingly professional detign work displayed in the Niag- ara-on-the-Lake courthouse.

The students and instructors have amassed a collage of highly persuasive and tasteful ad- vertisements. It's pleasmg art and demonstrates harj work and talent of the artists. Design students have set out a good array of women's fashions and fabrics, in- cluding shawls and dresses.

The material has been woven on the school's looms at tin Welland campus. Cosgrove, "there i s no room for an amateur or amateur work in this profession. The name of the game is money. We are commercial artists and our job is to sell. Catharines, but the Niagara-on-the-Lake show is the first major effort to bring the college's art work to the public. So far from to 1, persons have visitsd tile free show.

It is open every day from 1 p. Although Mr. Cosgrove wishes more people would view the work, he states there has been a number of inquiries by profiessiooals. Sponsored by Niagara for the Aged, it is a slide, and for the aged, it is a slide and verbal -presentation of the cul- tures and customs of various lands- Mrs. There were 59 graduates from the course, two of whom are shown here re- ceiving certificates.

Walter Cole and Mrs. He remarked that to really appre- ciate food and wines the class should expe- rience it first hand. We'll stay al the Ritz and see whal goes on for ourselves," Mr. Sullivan quipped. But, unknown to Mr. Sullivan, some of Jiis students took the remark seriously. We decided on a week, debated it and set up a three-week tour through France. Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and Britain. Sullivan 1 didn't even know what he started until we lold him two weeks later.

Mike and his associates got in touch with various organizations in Europe and have been invited on numerous tours, one ot Ihem conducted by the Comitc Inter- professionel des Vins de Champagne — a world renowned champagne corporation. Winery and vinyard tom'S. No other college in Ontario has students going to Europe, and who knqws, maybe we can make an annual affair.

One is from Montreal and one from Midland, but all the others are from Niag- ara iPeninsula centres. Although the origijial quotation that spawned the ides til'tiSve. SulUvan, he won't be going with' the group Saturday. Catharines Standard May 9, 19 Appointment Mr. Wel- land. La- Rose, R. He brings to this appoint- ment a depth of exiperienee gained over a period of eight years in a variety of respon- sible accounting positions.

Laflose Mr. Manera, President! LaRose has been asso- ; dated with Niagara College! Some 'good eating College students will visit Europe ST. The students took him up on it. Welland, Ont. LaRose received his tormal education in SI.

Catharines and is a graduate Registered Indus- trial Accountant. Fourteen students of Niag- ara College of Tectoiology leave this weekend for a three-week tour of hotels and reataurante in France, Ger- many, Italy, Luxembourg and England. They are paying their own way. Several weeks ago mstruc- tor Peter Sullivan quipped in class "Why don't we go to [ Paris for the weekend?

We'll stay at the Ritz and see Vthat goes on for ourselves. They de- cided on the three-week tour, but didn't tell Mr. SuUivan until arrangements were made. He won't be going along— 1 liis wife recently had a baby - "and that kind of ties him down," said Mike. He termed it an "expansion- ary budget" although he felt j Finance Minister John Turner has "a certain amount of reser- I vation about inflation".

Looked ] at overall, Lacavera thought it 'was "as good a budget as you could have given the economic conditions at present". He was sure "the stock market will quickly reflect optimism". Because of the concentration of manufaduring and proces- sing industries in Wellartd and the peninsula, he expects the budget will help directly here. Fletcher Peacock, vice-presi- dent and secretary-treasurer of Canada Forge said his first re- action was that "It is definitely a good step in the right direc- tion.

It can't do anything but have a favorable impact. He viso welcomed the treat- ment being accorded to the old- er people, by the budget provi- sions, particularly those over 65, Bruce Smith, business agent for the United Electrical and Madhine Worliers Umion Local did not think the corpora- tion tax cut would do much for the economy "except save some taxes" for big business. He did not foresee any great increase in employment resulting from the cuts and noted the unions had asked for moves in the other direction to help people directly.

Agreeing with the aims of the budget, he noted that "if the economy is strong, capital invest- ment will take care of itself" nd wished the equipment de- preciation moves had come a few years earlier when the eco- nomy first slowed down. Alex Sharp, area supervisor for the United Steelworkers said he hadn't had time to study the provisions, but in general he felt it was "pretty heavily on the side of business, but that's the name of the game in Can- ada", President of Niagara College, Dr.

Mat Earp. Cook niallpr. V from lllC I ijliy ei s gary, says. Tottelher I they orRanize the many events put on tor Ihe on. The variety of events and pro- j grams is. I "inP vrniip. The statement follows: Niagara College has manv links with the community that it serves; we hope to strengthen these links in the future by pro- viding whatever additional ser- vices our resources allow and by promoting the use of our ser- vices and facilities throu,ghout the community.

Generally, community colleges are concerned with the applica- tion of knowledge to practical work situations. Hence, all col- lege programs are designed with a base of knowledge and skills I required for a particular career. Students are al. There are many trend. College community, t. There are also many persons who wish to improve their knowl- edge and understanding of them- selves and society and to develop leisure time activities. For these and many other people that it can serve, Niagara Col- lege will strive to expand its range of offerings so as to reach more people and be more rele- vant to the needs of these people.

I have nttempted to outline in general [ terms some future directions that we hope to pursue. The Rosidcnls Council, com- ' pnsed of elected member. Two vultin-, i'-'pr. The maionlvl are in wheei:chairs and manv ; have had strokes leaving Iheni! Some art i I lefthand converts having lost ' the use of their r'ghf hands. Inne is Senior Citi?

With this feed- back, the faculty will be in a better po. To maintain and expand our link- age wiMi the real world, fi M trips, lield work, and other co- operative arrangements invol- ving work situations will be encouraged and expanded wher- ever possible.

A large number of persons are returning to ob- tain some form of additional edu- cation, either on a part-time or full - time basis. In some cases, it is to review and polish pre- viously acquired knowledge and assess, on a periodic basis, all skills; in many other cases The Evening Tribune - May II, St. Catharines Standard I! May 12, Grads Spread Local College Name Afar with an overall college aver- age of 90 per cent successful in fintting jobs, Niagara College graduates had "by and large a rather successful year" said placement officer Ken Anderson.

A brealidown of the vai'ious schools shows per cent of the business graduates who were :'of the applied arts grads -and 84 seeking employment in being placed, while 86 per cent found a job. In the applied arts division, graduates from the hortaculture teohni ci an, library technic ian , medical records technician, pub- lic administration assistant and journalism programs all had per cent employment rate.

While the employment rate for. The drop in technology center- ed mainly around the lack of employment opportunities in the electronics field, said Mr. Ander- sen, painting a rather depressed state of the electronics industry in Canada. Outlining some of the criteria for successful job placement.

Catharines and Welland area as examples. Niagara offers several unique courses not available elsewhere and stu- dents are able to find jobs out- side the area, Graduates have bfen placed in Alberta, Manito- ba and Quebec and Mr. Ander- son said he feels the attitude of moving elsewhere to get em- ployment is growing among the students.

To help graduates in their search for jobs, Mr. Anderson has prepared a placement kit and has films to prepare stu- dents for job interviews.

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Please contact Shann Hulme by phone 02 or by email shann. Switch Editions? Latest Popular Top Rated Trending. Channel: JV Barry library. All items are available on interlibrary loan Mark channel Not-Safe-For-Work? Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel. Previous Article Next Article. Giancola, Ralph E. Marlow Safer communities : a journal of practice, opinion, policy and research 13 2 Summary: Reviews the reasons why there has been a fall in the volume of recorded crime in the UK and other liberal economies What works and what does not work in reducing juvenile graffiti offending?

Apr [7] p Does methamphetamine use increase violent behaviour? Apr No body, no crime? Marlow Safer communities : a journal of practice, opinion, policy and research 13 2 Summary: Reviews the reasons why there has been a fall in the volume of recorded crime in the UK and other liberal economies.

May [20] p Turning up the heat on cold cases Blueprint no. Winter2 What can circle sentencing courts tell us about drug and alcohol problems affecting Aboriginal communities? As time goes on, I hope the human element will contin- ue to play a dominant role in our programs and that the type of education we provide -will make a definite contribuUoa towards the improvement of the human condition".

Manera ended his ad- dress with a tribute to commun- ity college graduates. Over the two - day session, courses in steward training, col- lective bargaining, union admin- istration, compensation, safety and health, the Unemployment Insurance Act and fhe New Democratic Party and labor's political responsibilities were presented to delegates from area locals.

George Marshall, regislrar for the session, said the CLC sponsors schools such as this across the country every Spring. The one at Niagara, he aid, was a small one with delegates ittending. Explaining the purpose behind the weekend schools. CLC educa- 'tion representative for the On- ' tario region, Robert Gower, said the classes aid local union offi- cers and those who aspire to be officers.

The course, part of the Niag- ara's school of continuing edu- cation spring and summer pro- gram, will run from August 7 :to 26 on the Nlagara-on-the-Lake ' campus. Workshops will be held on jazz and big band arranging ; jazz and pop choral interpretation ; basic sound recording techni- ques in the high school; and the practices, legalities and busi- ness of music. For the school or community music director, workshops will be held on adaptive arranging and score alteration and music theatre production techniques.

Those wishing to attend the session must have their appli- cations in to the college by June A special brochure for fur- ther information can be obtain- ed by phoning or writing the Wetland campus. I find tihat the older one comes home and teaches everything to the younger one.

The program, for children who will be attending kinder- garten in the school year began this past October and winds up later this month. It was approved by the board as a pilot project and was set up in three schools on a three morning per week basis at each; St. Andrew, Welland; St. Ther- esa. Port Colborne and St. Ann Niagara Falls. It was explained by Sister Johanna, the board's early child- hood education consultant and school principals Sister Vicfor- ine St.

Andrew ; Sister Oliva St. Theresa and Brian Kelly St. A miiiiite'board-made video- tape production showed what the course was all about, through act ual c las sroom learni ng ex- periences and glimpses of field trips. BASIC AIMS The two basic aims of the pro- gram were to develop language and social skills of the children Organizers were concerned with making the child feel com- fortable in coming to school, familiar with the school envir- onment and familiar with thera- elves.

The basic assumption was that if a child was made to feel free, to feel comfortable in the school setting, some of the dif- ficulties that cause learning teaming problems later on will be eliminated," he said. Sister Johanna, in explaining the philosophy underlying the program, said "education out- side the home must begm eai-ly and must aim to help the in- dividual to fulfill his potential because learning is a process that begins at birth.

Children had a considerable amount of adult direction but at the same time were made to feel secure without adult control. It is relevant to in- tellectual and socaal develop- ment. Play is mental activity, physical activity and creative activity.

He has to have a good, secure, happy feeling j about himself. In Jan. I The video - tape showed; children at work in the class- ' room painting, drawing at ; play in the gym on rope swings, ' climbing bars at play on the' playground slides, rolling cyl-j inders and on a field trip through Central fireball. Learning situations became alive through the use of house- hold pets, the telephone, the sandbox.

Classroom size was limited to about 20 students at each of the schools. It was also pointed out that many of the children came from families where English was not the prime language spoken in the home. Two of them were that it be allowed to continue in the three original schools next year and that it be expanded to three additional schools and be cal- led a junior kindergarten.

Hopefully, it just might come about. Kelly pointed out that sev- eral have requested information concerning it. Playwriglit Moliere in fact lias everything come out too right, in a takeoff on convention- al play endings. Long before then the audience has become accustomed to events reaching the pomt of ab- surdity, as satirical comments and repartee are mixed with sheer buffoonery and slapsticli The stories conceived by the title character.

Scapin, to tell the men he wants to bilk, re- quire considerable suspension of rationality. The story has two young men about Paris in the 's madly in love with two young maids. The girls are apparently without family connections, and the boys' fathers, both rich, are de- sirous of having suitable daugh- ters - in - law.

Back then boys as well as girl. To gel a nest - egg, each of the young men employ Scapin, a mere servant but gifted with an inventive mind and a glib tongue. He gets the money for each, makes a fool of one of the old men by tricking him into taking a beating and the other by scaring him. The girls turn out to have family, in fact they are the long lost daughters of I ho two old mi- sers, appropriately jorted out for the two sons. Not a loose end is left when the play con- cludes, A large representation muM.

Even the arthritic old men move hither, tilither and yon about the expanse and Scapin bounces around with fantastic energy under director Frank Norris' and assistant director Catiiy Camp's instructions. Costumes designed by the sec- ond - year theatre arts students were colorful and appropriate to the period. Mike McAIonen lied the whole thing together as Scapin.

He played the part with relish and was quite believable in verbal and facial expression and reac- tion. His chief adversary was Cer- onte played by Lloyd Dilworth. His reactions to the situations Scapin puts him in were eloquent and he matched the emotions in his lines. Pat Roberto did Ws us- usal excellent job in the part of Argante, the other old man.

Leandre played by Peter Ku- fluk and Octave played by Greg Rogers seemed quite properly the incompetent but earnest young men who provide the grist for Scapin's mill. Bonnie Campbell was a little uneven at first in the role of Zebinette.

Argant's daughter,! The show runs eveiy eveninai through Friday. Not so much that you can come and enjoy yourself. Not so much that you can play sports and wear tlie college sweater. But basic- ally that all the colleges exist for is to ensure that you grad- uate in a few years, h'ence with something called an education. As far as many people are concerned, a college is a college for education.

But I think these people are forget- ting some veiy basic and im- portant facts, facts that a col- lege is where you do earn an education. And I say earn be- cause it is a place for expci. It's a place to go out and learn thefive basic qualities without which you will never succeed m fite.

For Luciow, it was the second straight year he's been named top athlete at Ni- These five quaUties I think you learn more not in the class- room, not in your social activ- ities but basically on the basket- ball court, the football field and I be hockey rink, "The first is sacrifice. You lave to practice. Without prac- 1 tice you won't succeed, "What else did you learn this year? You learned something called determination.

If yo5 quit, you never, never succeed. When the goifig gets rough, thats when you have to get going. And determination is what life is all about. He's so proud because of the crest he has on his sweater. John Ferguson was a terrible skater, he couldn't pass the puck and he couldn't check. But he always managed to do something. And he had something, he had tremendous pride in the craft that he was and the sweater he wore. He' would have never had let the Montreal Canadiens lose last night Sunday after they had it.

He wouldn't have let them down. That is needed in a winner. The same with hockey. No man is an island. You'll find that out in life. You have to get along with other people. You have to work together "Team-work, whether you be a policeman, a college professor or a student.

In the police de- partment, team-work is the es- sance of survival. That's what you learn in sports more than an,vthing else. You have to obey the rules and reg- agara. He also spoke very highly of Als' coach Sam Etcheverry. Manera, president of Niagara College spoke before Sprmgate. He welcomed every- one to the banquet. Luciow, Niagara Basketball Knishts' leader all - round, was bestowed the honor last night at he third annual Athletic and Awards banquet sponsored by the Athletic Department and the Stu- dent Administrative Council.

Bob Kraliz was namrd the male freshman while Diane Audet was the female re- cipient. For the girls varsity volley- ball team, Diane Martens was selected the MVP while on the nasketball team. Lois Hajen was bestowed with the honor. Keith Taylor was named! When it came to the basket- ball Knights.

Luciow was hon- ored again with the MVP award. However, the hockey Knights had five members take home letters. The other letter went to Betty Olsen of the curUng team. Three students were also hon- bred v. Inter - mural winners for hockey, floor hockey and basket- ba'l received awards and badges for their past performances while Niagara's tennis, golf, badminton, ' curling, volleyball, basketball and hockey varsity teams in OCAA competition also received badges.

The two- some had, a very fine combined average of 2. Niagara's number one fan, Paul Forestell received a spe- cial award while the Knight's I hockey club presented a plaque i to coach Fred Bassi. But indivi- ually. Communications Gets Top V Niagara Student Priority I Improving communications will be one of the primary ainris of the new Niagara College stu- dent administrative council, and toward that end, a new position has been created on the council executive.

The idea, he said, was to im- prove communications not only internally, but externally as well. With the college growing in size, communications has become a full - time job and one person is needed to devote his Ume to it. Although communications may be lacking, Mr. LeFeuvre point- ed out the college has come a long way in solving problems in areas where some schools are still encountering difficulties.

The students at Niagara have a better relationship with the administration, better facilities and are more active in the social areas than many colleges, he caid. To keep up the good relations and communication between the administration and students, the council executive has a meeting every second week with college president Anthony Man- era where problems and sugges- tions from both sides can be aired.

Stone plans to have an information board in each build- ing for the posting of student information and will make ex- tensive use of the college radio and television facilities, the Ni- agara News the college news- paper and area papers, Future general meetings of the student body are also planned to aid in keeping all informed with activities programs, and prob- lems as they arise. LeFeuvre said the summer job situation was a "real thorn", but added he didn't know if the student government could do anything about it.

Stone pointed out a group of girls from the college early childhood education program have applied for a grant under the Opportunities for Youth pro- gram, to run a day care centre at the college over the summer. Director of Student Affairs Al Aboud added the college always hires a few students to work around the school in the sum-!

Stone suggested the area of providing accommodation for if students shougd be investigated. Aboud noted, all col-jj leges have been surprised by; the number of students drawn j from out of town and the factj; the schools have not developed,: as planned, along the lines of American commutor colleges. No college below Sudbury can use funds for building on-cam- pus residences, and although thej ; SAC investigated an offer of aij renovated building, the yearly!

Coming into power April 1, they have not yet had time to set up anything said Mr. Le- Febvre. Niagara-on-lhe-Lake, on Sunday, April Hob- ort Welch will officially open the p. It wiU be oijen lo liie pubuc at. This exhibition is designed lo introduce and promote the members and their work to tlic people of the Niagara area. Among the items presented will be e. April 11, 19 Some colleges don't even have a lounge.

LeFeuvre was addi-essing members of the press at a luncheon called to introduce members of the new council. He said students are con- sulted bv everi- level of admin- ish-ation on decisions which concern them, and this makes for few demonstrations and protests.

John Stone, head of internal affairs for the council, agreed IJiere are few activists, but con- fessed that the student body is apathetic. He suggested more bulletin boards, and better working relattan- ships ivith the school's tele- vision static. Stone said council is con- sidermg a program of visiting chssrodms and holding more Seiiernl meetinas of council which would be open to all stu- Idarts.

Abode, the college s direc- tor of student services, said the college wocid again employ a number of students to' do grounds work about the Well- fflid campus. Last year about 12 students were hired, he said'. The school term finishes April 21 and final examinations: will run from April 23 to Designed by Gerenscer and 'Russell of Welland, the link-up structure will house the college book store, counselling centre, placement office, staff lounge to serve and student coffee shop.

Tlie building will have 16, square feet of floor space and will be mostly one - storey. The link - up structure had to ; be built before the college could continue further building, said Director of Resources Allan Wyatt. The structure will serve as part of a central core linking up the newly - completed buldings to future development, and has an expected completion date of January. One move already undrr way.

Since September, there have been 60 returning students there and Mr. Wyatt said by next Sep- tember, there will be The transfer of these students will lead to the closing of the adult learning centre on East Main St. Wyatt said would probably occur "this fall. The Manpower students will all be taking their classes in Hennepin Hall, the first build- ing constructed on the Welland campus. Starting in February drainage! Also under consideration in the!

The Evening Tribune - April 12, ! Beth Bridge- man, recording secretary; Bill LeF'euvre. The professional unit is expensive with its heavy duty broadcast quality equipment. The economy line units are invari- ably standard vans which are functional but have inherent deficiencies. They are subject to rust and corrosion and may eventually succumb to electrolysis with the attendant cost of replacement parts and down-time maintenance. For on-location use there is a lack of high- way stability and high winds virtually preclude the technician's ability to roof- mount cameras.

The interiors are com- pact but have little or no turn-around space. Now there is a new unit on the market and in operation at the Niagara College of Applied Arts and Tech- nology. Paul Davoud, programme co-ordina- tor, radio and television department at the college said. It was at this point tenders for mobile units were put out and Denlen Elec- tronics Corporation entered the picture. Dennis Sullivan, president, and Maur- ice Evans, chief engineer, had been exploring and developing ideas for a compact unit which could be a standard for small broadcasters — cable com- panies, community colleges and for educational television.

The body is guaranteed for five years. It was aerodynamically designed for highway stability and has facilities for roof-mounting cameras. The unit is 24' overall with 6'7" headroom and 7'6" wide which affords technicians and supervisors freedom of movement without stooping and ample room for storage of cameras, cables and tripods. At right is the equipment rack. The Link cameras supplied with the unit are monochrome, have a built-in Rank Taylor-Hobson zoom lens with servo iris.

Remote CCU camera control units controls are provided to the engineer's position giving control of line and field scan reversal, negative and positive picture, remote servo and lift. At the ecu, aperture correction, gamma correction and cable equaliza- tion can be selected although the camera can be used with up to metres of cable without equalization.

The type camera can be modi- fied at a later date to color using an E. I, striped vidicon, which will be within the price range of most cable operations and colleges. The cameras have full talk back facilities, i. However, the fact remains that the viewer is used to professional quality pictures on the home receiver.

It will be open to the public from 3 to 9 p. Among the items on display will be posters, book jackets, textiles and costume design and weaving. The idea behind the spring term is to provide adults, both young and old, with an opportun- ity to relax ,have a little fun, take on a new activity, or get ready for summ er living. Last year, the first in which a spring evening program was offered, there was an exce'lent response from the public.

Arnot Mclntee, Dean of Continuing Education, expects this year's program to be even more popu- lar. With titles such as BarB-Q'ing for the Outdoor Chef, Special Photographic Projects for Summer, and Vegetable Garden- ing for the Homeowner, the ex- periences and courses planned invite us to a summer of inter- esting and enjoyable living.

One of the most unique courses is the "Antiquitours series, t'. This will be a series of 3 day lours, by bus. Registraotion in person For all spring courses Is on Tuesday and Wednesday. April 18 and 19; and interested individuals may tele- phone or 3S a di- rect line from WelSanrli, exten- sion 3R, for further details. Don MacDonald, chairman of.

Niagara CoUege's board of gov- lernors yesterday. He ipaid tribute to the "vital role! The provincial statute : which created the community. The members are ; drawn from the citizenry at large, with the main qualifica- [tion being an interest in the I course. In order to achieve hat goal, the staff needs a feedback from the community on the effective- ness of the teaching: Are people being trained for the right jobs, and if so, how thoroughly are.

The advisory committees are an excellent "medium of com- imunication" between the college and the public Dr. MacDonald I felt, wliich works both ways. Effective functioning of the col- lege depends greatly on this two- way communication, stressed the spokesman.

The lecture room has two rear projection screens and "a front projection screen racked over the blackboard, a movie screen rolled up in the ceiling. The tour was followed by a ' dinner, prepared and hosted by'l hotel management students at the i Refect or y i-n Niag ara Falls.

In keeping with its policy of holdmg Its meetings in as many cormnumtles in the Niagara Pen- insula as possible, the ne. Dunnville and Forf Erie. I Colborne. The policy recognizes tJie j fact the college serves an : area encompassing a , number of municipalities, according to!

Welland itself is honie to many forms of live stage activity, in addition o the sole movie liRa- Ire. The presenlahons range from. During the fall winter and spi'ing. The cnniTfIs IfiuI low. Music is also. Both work in Ihe field of ballet predominant ly. The stage at Centennial audi- torium is home to the Welland Little Theatre Players four times a year.

They mount their productions in their own quar- ters on Church St.. The annual drive fo sell season m'emberships for all foiu- plays is now on. The aim of the course is main- ly technical, but the best way to test iheir skills is wilh a an actual show.

Many 'of the students were offered jobs M. It is hoped this may also. The, last studio show w;is written by Ruth Swayze of Fori Erie. Plans are not yet definite, but I seems likely the students at! Charlie Brown" arranged by the Rotary Club. This summer a group of young performers lead by Dcsmon'! Davies Lif Brock University will r-ovrv the ai-ea. Tn applied ai'ts. I Business-minded students can choose from several business ma- nagement program marketing courses, secretarial, all aspects ;0f computer work, btatistioal.

The display runs until Sunday and is open to the pu 9 p. The oim of the shqvV' h and their work to area retail'? What inter- est there is lies only in the stor-i ies. This particular show put on by the School of Continuuing Education used some of the staff and one Theatre Arts student but four persons were iiew tO'the stage.

The difference' in experi- enced and unexperienced per- sonnel was very marked with only Ogwen Glyn - Jones, Ivor and Evelyn Humphrey's really coming to life. A set design by Gree Rogers ; with various levels and tomb- stones behind each of the eight ' readers did rather suggest a j rural hillside cemetery.

Ught- ' ing by Peter Kufluk was too dif- fuse, further missing an oppor- tunity to add some dramatic ex- citement to the production. The singers were Denize j lonita and Christine Macif i with Victor Silvio plaving the Iguitar, singing and doing some i readings. A series of eight quite diverse plays is being lined up again for nest season's presentations at the Niagara College Theatre Centre on Empire St.

The the- atre will reopen in September. There will also be informal stu- dio productions and the chil- dren's Saturday workshops will be continued then also. The post-war craze on educa- tion is a practical reality in Nia- gara South, especially in Welland where well over 1, persons are involved in adult education. Two excellent programs pro- vided by Niagara South board of education and Niagara College attract businessmen, housevives, technicians, factory workers, farmers and secretaries and pro- vide a kaleidoscope of courses.

The city's four secondary schools currently attract per- Sewing is a big hit with the ladies, according to Mr. J Krar. The wcpk project involves 40 lo 5t teachers who provide courses Monday through Thurs- day. Centennial nrovidcs the most complete prngrair: of the four schools in the cty including com- mercial courses, cake decorating, flower arranging. English, French.

Ukranian, j GerTnan, and Spanish. Welland High and Vocational School offers sewing, art and guitar; E"astdale. Lnstrumental strings music lis available at Fitch St, Senior iSchooI and attracts mosdy ele- imentary school pupils. Labor Studies Program Here II Canadian First It's education with a differ- ence at Niagara College where labor and management sit down together — not to discuss their differences — but to study and learn; where industrial supervi- sors take time off during the working day to concentrate in- stead on books and seminars.

These are just a sampling of the college'.? Whitahouse, assistant dean of the school, said, "Uni- queness runs right through this school. Thii is just what his proyianis nltempts to do. In an a-iie of ecn- nomic crises and industrial un- rest, labor education can help both Unionists and management "replace unreasoned emotion oy a professional approach to col- lective bargaining," Enrolment has increased and programs have broadened every year.

In the first year of the labor studies program, only the history of the trade unions in Canada was taught. Courses now include human relations in the union, communication, contem- porary social problems, econo- mics and psycRology. Courses in Ihi. Fourteen - full - iinii-. White- hnnse said, "An average of A special sort of instructor is needed lo kindle this interest and involvement, Mr. White- house said.

The educator of working adults must have life and work experience as well as academic background. He must he able to bring meaning and relevance to the classroom; he muit have empathy with the adult student. A two - year program leading to a diploma in industrial rela- tions in geared to a broad range of career opportunities and is "designed to provide knowledge and understanding of industrial relations processes, and of hu- man behavior, as well as skills in problem-solving.

Objectives of the certifi-cate progam in labor. Krar recalls several suc- cess stories from his involvement with the adult education program over the past eight years. He said that two years ago two ' persons took a complete grade 13 course in night school. He also mentioned a retired couple in their 70s who took a course in conversational Span- ish at the school a few years ago to prepare for a trip to Mex- ico.

They returned to the class- room the following year to take jthe advanced course in Spanish land spent two months in an iso- lated Mexican village, completely fluent. One high school dropout took the adult education program to j "prove to me and my parents" : that she could get her secondary school diploma. She did. The story of self- achievement is repeated yearly. One unique aspect of the adidt education program in Welland, as in other areas of the province is that of community involve- ment.

This year, two courses in Ukrainian and two in yoga arc being caught because of commuiii'v requests. Enrolmrni is divided fairly evenly b. Tbe adult education lirogram in secondary sdiools had drop. OOfl persons. Well over courses are avail- able in the fields of business, applied arts and technology and special interest. The bulk of the courses are of- fered from Monday through Thursday with the occasional course on a Saturday morning. According to Arnot Mclntee.

In the first term, which ran from , September to December, 1, ' were enrolled. The "feature attraction" this , year seems to be the course in ' western civilization with an en- : rolment of 90 persons. A study of tlie history of the Niagara Peninsula also attracts a good crowd, says Mr. A course in "fire science" or firefighting was launched this year at the Welland campus with an excellent turnout. Other popular courses include speed reading, retail sales, ac- counting, industrial hydrauhcs and heat treatment.

In addition to classroom In- struction, the college's extension branch is also involved in appren- ticeships, working closely with local industries. In the fall term, courses j were offered at the Welland cam- , pus and a total of across the peninsula in other centres such as St. Fort Erie and Dunnville. The second term consists of a total if courses with 85 being offered in Wei]land. While much of the leisure time The Evening Tribune - April 29, will be taken up with some sort of recreation,, many of the mem- bers oi Welland's adult world will turn to such centres as Nia- gara College and the city's ele- mentary and secondary schools ;to engage in some sort of learn- ing process.

When the Addiction Research Foundation undertook drug us- age surveys in the former Lin- coln and Welland County area and Haldimand County, the com- puter was called in to process and compile all the findings. More recently, students at the college have been at work com- piling the Ontario Hockey Asso- ciation Junior A statistics and converting them over to be com- piled on the college computer.

The main, general purpose computer, a Honeywell Calder noted since the machine was installed, it has been upgraded twice and a third upgrading is under consideration. This is one O'f the major factors against purchasing such a ma- chine outright. With its 24, locations of memory, each of which can hold one character, the Niagara com- puter is unique in that it is a straight tape system- Most sys- tems, said Mr. The main differeiic-o in Ihe two types, he said, i. Cal- der stressed that any leasing of computer time would be on a "very, very casual basis," and the work would have to be of academic value to ihe students.

Over the year, he said. Of the remaining 50 per cent of the time, "a good chunk" is taken up processing the regis- tration, student grades and fin- ancial affairs for the college. A League, utilizing the college computer. For much of the season, stu- dents compiled the statistics manually but 'ate February the system was in the pncess of being totally computeriied.

Leaving Sept. Davoud will start woi'k in October, pro- ducing a series of documentar- ies for the Commission and pos- sibly doing some outside work with the Australian Fedcation of Commercial Television. Starting out with the CBC. Davoud's career has already taken him far and wide across Canada. This led to more documentar- jies and eventually a job as stu- dio director for the Toronto based program, "Sunday Morning".

Davoud decid- ed to travel to Vancouver- He got as far as the Lake- head, where he stopped to 'visit relatives and while there, he dis- covered community colleges. Deciding to see what the new- 1 ly established college system was like, Mr. Davoud stopped at the local school, saw what it was like, met the administration, and four hours later was sign- ing a contract to help the col- lege start up a felevision depart- ment.

That was i three ':years ago. One who obviously enjoys hisj work. Davoud cited Niagara I for the "outstanding" courses j and facilities offered, naming in; particular, radio and television, : journalism and theatre arts. Personally, it will be the f ul- 1 fullment of a longtime wish to! The attitude at the college.

When new facilities are com- pleted, the retraining program's i counselling staff will amalga- mate with the college's coun- i selling department and Henne- I pia Hall will be renovated this j summer to accommodate the retraining students. I The East Main St. Early in June, ; Fred W. Frohwein and Dr. Saltarelli and Mr. Ny- gren visited the counselling cen- tres at St. Catharines and Kit- chener under the Ontario Man- power Retraining Program spon- sored by their local boards of education.

A full - scale meeting was held between representatives of all appropriate departments and agencies in the city to obtain their views and assess the inter- est in, and need f-or, a counsel- ling centre. The Welland board of educa- tion was directed to move the project forward and during the term, the board's advisory vocational committee appointed an Ontario Manpower Retrain- ing committee under the chair- manship of Rueben McArthur, This committee found the site and recommended they proceed quickly with a centre for adult counselling.

During the commit- tee's hunt for a site, it was de- cided to expand the purpose to include classroom facilities along with counselling- The Main St. SERVICE PROVIDED Counselling at the centre was mainly oriented towards educa- tion counselling and vocational guidance, but there was some overlapping to include family, ibudgeting and ipastoraj counsel- ling as the need was required- The courses offered at the centre are commercial steno- grapher, machine shop, welding operator, upgradinig to the grade 10 level and English as a second language for new Cana- dians.

The centre developed under the guidance of the Welland board of education, but it was, turned over to Niagara College of I Applied Arts and Technology July 1, The additional renova-' tion at the college will make! Patrons can expect whisky bottles, cereal boxes, Grand Funk and auto parts. The show, which opened Sunday, is the work of about ad graphic arts and fashion design students from Niagara College.

It focuses on commercial art, and there is some steikingly professional detign work displayed in the Niag- ara-on-the-Lake courthouse. The students and instructors have amassed a collage of highly persuasive and tasteful ad- vertisements. It's pleasmg art and demonstrates harj work and talent of the artists. Design students have set out a good array of women's fashions and fabrics, in- cluding shawls and dresses.

The material has been woven on the school's looms at tin Welland campus. Cosgrove, "there i s no room for an amateur or amateur work in this profession. The name of the game is money. We are commercial artists and our job is to sell. Catharines, but the Niagara-on-the-Lake show is the first major effort to bring the college's art work to the public.

So far from to 1, persons have visitsd tile free show. It is open every day from 1 p. Although Mr. Cosgrove wishes more people would view the work, he states there has been a number of inquiries by profiessiooals. Sponsored by Niagara for the Aged, it is a slide, and for the aged, it is a slide and verbal -presentation of the cul- tures and customs of various lands- Mrs. There were 59 graduates from the course, two of whom are shown here re- ceiving certificates.

Walter Cole and Mrs. He remarked that to really appre- ciate food and wines the class should expe- rience it first hand. We'll stay al the Ritz and see whal goes on for ourselves," Mr. Sullivan quipped. But, unknown to Mr. Sullivan, some of Jiis students took the remark seriously. We decided on a week, debated it and set up a three-week tour through France. Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and Britain. Sullivan 1 didn't even know what he started until we lold him two weeks later.

Mike and his associates got in touch with various organizations in Europe and have been invited on numerous tours, one ot Ihem conducted by the Comitc Inter- professionel des Vins de Champagne — a world renowned champagne corporation. Winery and vinyard tom'S. No other college in Ontario has students going to Europe, and who knqws, maybe we can make an annual affair.

One is from Montreal and one from Midland, but all the others are from Niag- ara iPeninsula centres. Although the origijial quotation that spawned the ides til'tiSve. SulUvan, he won't be going with' the group Saturday. Catharines Standard May 9, 19 Appointment Mr.

Wel- land. La- Rose, R. He brings to this appoint- ment a depth of exiperienee gained over a period of eight years in a variety of respon- sible accounting positions. Laflose Mr. Manera, President! LaRose has been asso- ; dated with Niagara College!

Some 'good eating College students will visit Europe ST. The students took him up on it. Welland, Ont. LaRose received his tormal education in SI. Catharines and is a graduate Registered Indus- trial Accountant. Fourteen students of Niag- ara College of Tectoiology leave this weekend for a three-week tour of hotels and reataurante in France, Ger- many, Italy, Luxembourg and England.

They are paying their own way. Several weeks ago mstruc- tor Peter Sullivan quipped in class "Why don't we go to [ Paris for the weekend? We'll stay at the Ritz and see Vthat goes on for ourselves. They de- cided on the three-week tour, but didn't tell Mr. SuUivan until arrangements were made.

He won't be going along— 1 liis wife recently had a baby - "and that kind of ties him down," said Mike. He termed it an "expansion- ary budget" although he felt j Finance Minister John Turner has "a certain amount of reser- I vation about inflation". Looked ] at overall, Lacavera thought it 'was "as good a budget as you could have given the economic conditions at present". He was sure "the stock market will quickly reflect optimism". Because of the concentration of manufaduring and proces- sing industries in Wellartd and the peninsula, he expects the budget will help directly here.

Fletcher Peacock, vice-presi- dent and secretary-treasurer of Canada Forge said his first re- action was that "It is definitely a good step in the right direc- tion. It can't do anything but have a favorable impact. He viso welcomed the treat- ment being accorded to the old- er people, by the budget provi- sions, particularly those over 65, Bruce Smith, business agent for the United Electrical and Madhine Worliers Umion Local did not think the corpora- tion tax cut would do much for the economy "except save some taxes" for big business.

He did not foresee any great increase in employment resulting from the cuts and noted the unions had asked for moves in the other direction to help people directly. Agreeing with the aims of the budget, he noted that "if the economy is strong, capital invest- ment will take care of itself" nd wished the equipment de- preciation moves had come a few years earlier when the eco- nomy first slowed down. Alex Sharp, area supervisor for the United Steelworkers said he hadn't had time to study the provisions, but in general he felt it was "pretty heavily on the side of business, but that's the name of the game in Can- ada", President of Niagara College, Dr.

Mat Earp. Cook niallpr. V from lllC I ijliy ei s gary, says. Tottelher I they orRanize the many events put on tor Ihe on. The variety of events and pro- j grams is. I "inP vrniip. The statement follows: Niagara College has manv links with the community that it serves; we hope to strengthen these links in the future by pro- viding whatever additional ser- vices our resources allow and by promoting the use of our ser- vices and facilities throu,ghout the community.

Generally, community colleges are concerned with the applica- tion of knowledge to practical work situations. Hence, all col- lege programs are designed with a base of knowledge and skills I required for a particular career. Students are al. There are many trend. College community, t. There are also many persons who wish to improve their knowl- edge and understanding of them- selves and society and to develop leisure time activities.

For these and many other people that it can serve, Niagara Col- lege will strive to expand its range of offerings so as to reach more people and be more rele- vant to the needs of these people. I have nttempted to outline in general [ terms some future directions that we hope to pursue.

The Rosidcnls Council, com- ' pnsed of elected member. Two vultin-, i'-'pr. The maionlvl are in wheei:chairs and manv ; have had strokes leaving Iheni! Some art i I lefthand converts having lost ' the use of their r'ghf hands. Inne is Senior Citi? With this feed- back, the faculty will be in a better po. To maintain and expand our link- age wiMi the real world, fi M trips, lield work, and other co- operative arrangements invol- ving work situations will be encouraged and expanded wher- ever possible.

A large number of persons are returning to ob- tain some form of additional edu- cation, either on a part-time or full - time basis. In some cases, it is to review and polish pre- viously acquired knowledge and assess, on a periodic basis, all skills; in many other cases The Evening Tribune - May II, St. Catharines Standard I! May 12, Grads Spread Local College Name Afar with an overall college aver- age of 90 per cent successful in fintting jobs, Niagara College graduates had "by and large a rather successful year" said placement officer Ken Anderson.

A brealidown of the vai'ious schools shows per cent of the business graduates who were :'of the applied arts grads -and 84 seeking employment in being placed, while 86 per cent found a job. In the applied arts division, graduates from the hortaculture teohni ci an, library technic ian , medical records technician, pub- lic administration assistant and journalism programs all had per cent employment rate.

While the employment rate for. The drop in technology center- ed mainly around the lack of employment opportunities in the electronics field, said Mr. Ander- sen, painting a rather depressed state of the electronics industry in Canada. Outlining some of the criteria for successful job placement.

Catharines and Welland area as examples. Niagara offers several unique courses not available elsewhere and stu- dents are able to find jobs out- side the area, Graduates have bfen placed in Alberta, Manito- ba and Quebec and Mr. Ander- son said he feels the attitude of moving elsewhere to get em- ployment is growing among the students. To help graduates in their search for jobs, Mr. Anderson has prepared a placement kit and has films to prepare stu- dents for job interviews.

He went on to pay tribute to the college staff, who, he said, are always prepared to give prospective employers' an in-de- pth view of college programs so they can see what trainmg the students receive. The employment situation is tightening up. Anderson noted the number of on-campus recruiters coming to colleges and universities is down across Canada. Anderson noted recruiters who have come to Niagara have been very impressed with the students they have hired and are coming back.

George ,Kerr, minister of colleges and I universities, that Dr. Sturgeon has accepted the appointment, which is effective immeidate- ly. Oatharinee yesterday. Manera, recently appointed president of the Welland-based college, traced the close invdvement of the comjmiunity colleges with their communities at the luncheon meeting, held in the Welland Vale adult learning centre here. TJiere were almast people serving on these comitttees, he said, and "the colleges couldn't have become a suc- cess without them.

Manera, which 'by taking them into Hie field in' whiah they might eventually work gave them an element of realty, of "teing where the action is. Many of them get firm job offers which is great for fheir mor- vale. Those were program-related Unks but there was also in- volvement in other ways whereoy groups in the com- munity may use college faci- lities, even its data-processing ; equipment, to help them in their projects at a low pay- ment of a non-profit basis.

Manera said a program was planned related to the educa- tional and cultural devel- opment of the commimity. The college would host semi- nars and public forums on various issues, bringing con- cerned people together to get at the facts. Arts and Technology ;s anuci- Out of 1. Students I last year. I School registrar. Peter Roos. IVIay I Because if the large number! Roos reported :hat the Dental Assistant program can take 24 student-s and have applied.

The Early Childhood education course has openings for -in students and ! Roos reports hat students] who are accepted, but who tail! Total number of students to; register with Niagara College is , projected at 1, for this fall. Tihe situation is not peculiar to this col- lege, flie said, many are experiencing the sam? Pamt of the explanation is mul- tiple application, mhere one st-udent applies to more than one college.

So far, the college has admittec'i or of- fered 'Space to 1. After a student is offered admittaace, ho- is giiven 14 days to' pay tHie deposit. Mafny, said Mr. Roos, have to be re- jected not because tthey don't meet ihe ioiiiii- im'um requirement'?

If possible, hcwever. There will also be reci- pitnts of the general college dip- loma. The School of Applied Arts of the College will graduate stu- dents with two - year diplomas in the areas of early childhood e d u c a t i 0 n, educational re- sources technician, graphic arts technician, horticultural techni- cian, journalism advertising and public relations , 1 and security administration, li- brary technician, medical rec- ords technician, public adminis- tration, radio and television arts, social service.

Certificates will also be presented to graduates of the law enforcement and dental sistant programs. Graduating from the School of Business are studenis with dip- lomas from the three - year busi- ness administration programs as well as students from the two- year programs, general bu- sines. The School of Technology will also present two - year techni- cian graduates in construction, electronic, instrumentatinn.

The School of Labor Studies I and Industrial -Relations will is- : sue a certificate in the labor : management realtions program. The Hon. LaMarsh, for- ; mer member of Parliament, minister of national health and welfare and secretary of state of Canada, will present the Convo- 1 cation address. Miss LaMarsh is currently engaged in her law practice in the peninsula. MacDooald, chair- man of the college's board of j governors, will serve as chair- man of this fifth graduation I ceremony, I Following the ceremonies at I Centennial Secondary School,!

ReguHitar Peter Roos. Part of the ejcplanation is mul- liple application, where one student applies to more than otie coflege. So far, the college has admitted or of- fered space! Tf the student fails to pay Vithin the time limil and someone else is waiting to be acimitted, he space is offered to tliat per- son. Ttie hea'viast areas for applicatione, said Mr. Roos, are the dental technician pro- gi am. A total of 3TI s. Anna Oram memorial award: Agnes Gerry.

Association of food service and hospitality exhibitors award: Ju- dith A. Concordia Management Ltd. Dean Wyatt awards: Brian Burton. Dennis McK'intufk, iJa- viil Sinclair. Dontal Assist. Henderson dental assistants award: Monica Blatt. David Easter- brook. Lnnnan Chapter award: Marli Ilinlcn. Ivan D. Library technician advisory committee award: Douglas Will- ford. Niagara Wire Weaving Co. Award: Robert H, Fergu- ;son. Ontario association of certi- fied engineering technicians and technologists scholarships; Alek- sanrler Kocriila, Pelpr A.

Stewart and Hinan Construe- : tion Ltd. I- ln-. Bernard McNa- mee, Douglas Willfdrd. Helen Gulbon, Edwin Bre:,ki. Lois Has:en, Kafhryn Burgman. Sinclair Thealre Arts faculty award: Riil f'i- Homliotish. Manera, Presioenl of Niagara College and at 31 years of age, the youngest community college president in Ontario , and 3fll Le- fcbvrt. Marino: Mr. AAanera, I exactly what is a community college? We hope by informing j tne public as much as poss-! Manera, there has definitely been a criticism of community coll- eges that it's a school for dropouts.

In other woras, anyone who doesn't have the necessary capacity to go on to university for a B. One cf the criticims of the universities in the past was that they were too selective and it was felt that if a community college v. The thing that must be emphasized is that while it's easy to get in from the point of view of giving everybody a second chance, it's not easy to get out. AAai'ino: There has been another criticism that not only was it a school for drop- outs who coulJn t go onto university or some other higher level of education, but also iust to keep men and women off the labour market for awhile.

Manera: It Is simply to provide young men and women and older men end women, the opporvunitv to get a post secondary edu- cation in a relatively short period of time so they can go cut and earn a I'ving or get further education 'n some cases. Kefebvre: My answer probably isn't the same as - many other people. As it stands right now, I th! Niagara - 2 courses 1 Indi's- trial Relr. They c ive gda creditation for the courses taken al Niagara and this is the reason why!

Lefebvre: Grade 13, or you can get in as a noture stu- dent. If ycu come from ano ther post secondary insli- tution you can get in. Lefebvre; Exams. Manera: That's correct.